A recent study [coauthored by UCI Economics Professor Matthew Harding) that examined millions of grocery store purchases in the United States found that dubious claims about sugar, salt and fat were common. Many fruit juices that claimed to be low in sugar, for example, tended to have added sugars and more sugar than comparable juices with no claims on them. Some breakfast cereals labeled low in calories had more calories than the cereals that did not make calorie claims. And sports, energy, tea and coffee drinks with low-sodium claims had almost 17 percent more sodium than similar products with no sodium claims on them.

For the full story, please visit https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/26/well/eat/are-foods-labeled-low-sugar-misleading-consumers.html.

 

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