“Healthy individuals who use psychostimulants for cognitive enhancement may incur unintended costs to cognitive processes that depend on good sleep,” says lead author Lauren Whitehurst, a former graduate student in the Sleep and Cognition Lab at University of California, Irvine,who’s now a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco. “Our research shows that while psychostimulants may mildly curb natural attentional deterioration across the day, their use also disturbs sleep and post-sleep executive function.”

For the full story, please visit https://www.futurity.org/psychostimulants-sleep-memory-2128502/.

 

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