Teaching

I typically teach two Ph.D. courses and two undergraduate courses each year. In the Ph.D., I've recently been teaching a course in the core Macroeconomics sequence, and I teach field courses in Advanced Macroeconomics, Monetary Economics, Time Series Econometrics, and, more occasionally, International Macroeconomics. In Advanced Macro, I have lately focused on topics that can be labeled as 'Behavioral Macroeconomics'.

At the undergraduate level, I regularly teach a writing course on Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy and a research course for honors students titled Economics Honors Colloquium; I've also taught Intermediate Macroeconomics, Money & Banking, Global Economy, Econometrics, Micro Theory for Quantitative Econ students, and freshman seminars on economic inequality and social mobility, and on learning economics through sports.
I'm now serving as Director of Graduate Studies for the Economics Ph.D. Program. Before, I was Director of the Undergraduate Honors Program in Economics.
Current and Scheduled:
Spring 2022

Past:
Fall 2021
Summer Session II 2021
Summer Session I 2021
Spring 2021
Winter 2021
Summer 2020
Spring 2020
Winter 2020
Spring 2019
Winter 2019
Fall 2018
Summer 2018
Spring 2018
Fall 2017
Winter 2017
Fall 2016
Winter 2016
Spring 2015
Winter 2015
  • ECON 269 - Empirical Macroeconomics (Ph.D.)
  • Field course for second and third-year Ph.D. students interested in doing research in macro, international macro, or time series econometrics.

  • ECON 190A - Economics Honors Colloquium I (undergraduate)
  • This is a research-based course for honors students. Students develop a research idea, find data, formulate an empirical strategy, and write a honors thesis by the end of the year.
Fall 2014
  • UNI STU 3 - Economic Inequality and Social Mobility (Freshman Seminar, undergraduate)
  • This is a seminar course that I teach for freshman students. We read and discuss papers on income and wealth inequality (starting from Piketty and Saez, QJE, 2003), on intergenerational mobility, on nature versus nurture's effects on children outcomes, and on the relation between economic inequality and political power.
Spring 2014
Winter 2014
Fall 2013
Summer 2013
Spring 2013
Winter 2013
Fall 2012
Summer 2012
Spring 2012
Fall 2011