Spring 2017: Wednesdays @ 3pm in SBSG 2221
Faculty Leader: Lisa Pearl, Linguistics and Cognitive Sciences, UCI


Discussion board
Current members
Topics of interest

Discussion board: http://colareadinggroup.blogspot.com/

Current Members:
Alandi Bates, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Galia Barsever, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Kimberly Jameson, Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences, UCI
Greg Hickok, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Jeff Krichmar, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Roger Levy, Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, MIT
K.J. Savinelli, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Greg Scontras, Department of Linguistics, UCI
Sameer Singh, Department of Computer Science, UCI
Ed Stabler, Department of Linguistics, UCLA
Mark Steyvers, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Kie Zuraw, Department of Linguistics, UCLA

Previous Members/Alumni:
Natasha Abner, Department of Linguistics, UCLA
Derrik Asher, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Bagher Babaali, Information and Computer Sciences, UCI
Nicole Beckage, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Sue Braunwald, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Robert Coleman, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Robert Daland, Department of Linguistics, UCLA
Gabriel Doyle, Department of Linguistics, UCSD
Daniel Kislyuk, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Hilary Cunningham, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Mohsen Hejrati, Information and Computer Sciences, UCI
Sabine Huemer, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Hansol Lee, School of Education, UCI
Ray Mendoza, IMBS, UCI
Brent Miller, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Ben Mis, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Percy Mistry, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Dave Newman, Information and Computer Sciences, UCI
Jessamy Norton-Ford, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Lawrence Phillips, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Chen Qin, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Tim Rubin, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Kevin Ryan, Department of Linguistics, Harvard
Shannon Stanton, Information and Computer Sciences, UCI
Aparna Subramanian, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Jose Tabares, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Sean Tauber, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Brandon Turok, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI
Caroline Wagenaar, Information and Computer Sciences, UCI
Jim White, Information and Computer Sciences, UCI
Daniel Wolf, Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences, UCI
Ted Wright, Department of Cognitive Sciences, UCI

Topics of interest include:

  • computational models of language learning/acquisition
  • computational learning theory
  • principles underlying models of language learning and change
  • modeling information extraction from language by humans
Language learning/acquisition: Language is an amazingly complex system of knowledge that must be learned from noisy input. That very young children who don't have the cognitive sophistication to count to four can accomplish this task is no small wonder. That adults who have far more cognitive resources and learning strategies - not to mention knowledge of their native language - can't is perhaps even more striking. How is this possible?

Computational learning theory: This includes formal representations of learnability, with particular interest in connections to language acquisition by humans.

Principles underlying models of language learning and change: These include discussions of fundamental assumptions (e.g., analysis by synthesis), processes underlying linguistic development, the relationship between language acquisition and language change, and processes of linguistic evolution.

Modeling information extraction from language by humans: Humans have an amazing ability to extract all kinds of information from language text, including direct information such as content and indirect information such as sentiment, attitude, emotion, and intention. Since the only information available is the language, humans must be using linguistic cues to do so. What are these cues? Are there additional informative cues available, besides the ones humans naturally use? How good (or bad) are humans at noticing various linguistic cues?